18.3 C
Paris
vendredi, août 19, 2022

New Book : « Empire of Salons: Conquest and Community in Early Modern Ottoman Lands » Helen Pfeifer

A history of the Ottoman incorporation of Arab lands that shows how gentlemanly salons shaped culture, society, and governance

Must read

« At summit, Erdogan, Putin still divided on SyriaRead more ». Al Monitor staff 

Ankara agreed said Al Monitor on the 5th of August 2022 that part of its natural gas payments to Moscow would be switched to...

Au sujet de « La promesse d’Hasan », film turc, sorti en France en plein mois d’août/Nora SENI

Le vent souffle sans répit dans le film de Semih Kaplanoglu, ployant branches, bruissant feuillages, malmenant les clôtures faits d'assemblages irréguliers de bois secs....

Turkey’s Mission Becomes More Difficult If Attacks on Ukrainian Ports Continue- PANORAMA/Selmin Seda Coşkun

Selmin Seda Coskun from the Thomas More Institute in Paris wrote in Panorama, Online of the 4th of August 2022, an indepth article...

L’accord céréalier, un succès diplomatique pour le président Erdogan. LE MONDE/Marie Jégo

Après la sécurisation du passage d’un premier cargo, le président turc rencontre Vladimir Poutine vendredi, à Sotchi, pour parler notamment de l’Ukraine et de...

Pfeifer, H. (2022). Empire of Salons: Conquest and Community in Early Modern Ottoman Lands. Princeton University Press.

Overview

« Historians have typically linked Ottoman imperial cohesion in the sixteenth century to the bureaucracy or the sultan’s court. In Empire of Salons, Helen Pfeifer points instead to a critical but overlooked factor: gentlemanly salons. Pfeifer demonstrates that salons—exclusive assemblies in which elite men displayed their knowledge and status—contributed as much as any formal institution to the empire’s political stability. These key laboratories of Ottoman culture, society, and politics helped men to build relationships and exchange ideas across the far-flung Ottoman lands. Pfeifer shows that salons played a central role in Syria and Egypt’s integration into the empire after the conquest of 1516–17.

Pfeifer anchors her narrative in the life and network of the star scholar of sixteenth-century Damascus, Badr al-Din al-Ghazzi (d. 1577), and she reveals that Arab elites were more influential within the empire than previously recognized. Their local knowledge and scholarly expertise competed with, and occasionally even outshone, that of the most powerful officials from Istanbul. Ultimately, Ottoman culture of the era was forged collaboratively, by Arab and Turkophone actors alike.

Drawing on a range of Arabic and Ottoman Turkish sources, Empire of Salons illustrates the extent to which magnificent gatherings of Ottoman gentlemen contributed to the culture and governance of empire. »

For more information CLICK HERE

More articles

Latest article

« At summit, Erdogan, Putin still divided on SyriaRead more ». Al Monitor staff 

Ankara agreed said Al Monitor on the 5th of August 2022 that part of its natural gas payments to Moscow would be switched to...

Au sujet de « La promesse d’Hasan », film turc, sorti en France en plein mois d’août/Nora SENI

Le vent souffle sans répit dans le film de Semih Kaplanoglu, ployant branches, bruissant feuillages, malmenant les clôtures faits d'assemblages irréguliers de bois secs....

Turkey’s Mission Becomes More Difficult If Attacks on Ukrainian Ports Continue- PANORAMA/Selmin Seda Coşkun

Selmin Seda Coskun from the Thomas More Institute in Paris wrote in Panorama, Online of the 4th of August 2022, an indepth article...

L’accord céréalier, un succès diplomatique pour le président Erdogan. LE MONDE/Marie Jégo

Après la sécurisation du passage d’un premier cargo, le président turc rencontre Vladimir Poutine vendredi, à Sotchi, pour parler notamment de l’Ukraine et de...

« Turkey’s inflation hits almost 80% as Erdogan insists on low-rate policy ». Mustafa Sönmez/AL MONITOR

"Despite a relative slowdown in July, Turkey’s consumer inflation appears on course to overshoot the central bank’s newly revised year-end forecast of 60.4%" says...